Whoa boy video | Landholders Driving Change

Whoa boys prevent water damage to roads, tracks

Fast flowing water caused by heavy rainfall can wreak havoc on rural roads and access tracks, and fencelines.

Constructing erosion control banks, also known as whoa boys, is a simple and cost-effective way to slow down and spread water flow.

This video shows you how to do it.

Thanks to Darryl Hill for his assistance with making the video. Darryl is one of only a few qualified instructors in Australia running grader workshops for soil conservation.

The video was produced as part of the Landholders Driving Change (LDC) project, a Burdekin Major Integrated Project funded through the Queensland Government through the Queensland Water Quality Program.  Reducing soil erosion is a key component of the LDC project.

Straight from the expert

Darryl Hill is one of only a few qualified instructors in Australia running grader workshops for soil conservation.  As part of the LDC project Darryl has trained landholders and plant contractors around Bowen and Collinsville.

His training provides practical, alternative approaches to prevent water erosion on station roads, tracks, firebreaks and fence lines.  

This short video is Darryl Hill talking about erosion control banks (whoa boys), what are their purpose, where they should be constructed and what to do to maintain them.

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